Bay Street Bull Magazine: Luxury Business and Lifestyle

Health

Extreme Therapies

7 Alternative Ways to Recharge and Get You Back On Your Feet

words by Nicholas Mizera

The market may close at 4PM, but clocking out won’t always prevent you from feeling overwhelmed by today’s hectic workplace. When that happens, you need to recharge—stat. While you may not have the time to jet off for a week, you can still explore a new experience that’s just as relaxing as a day on the beach right in your own city. Unlike your smartphone, these examples of extreme wellness treatments use technology to help you de-stress and reset your world. Give them and you’ll be back at 100 percent in no time.

Vitamin IV drip

Whether it’s a 50-hour workweek or that one Scotch too many, life can leave you mentally and physically drained. That feeling of general malaise could be a sign of nutritional deficiency. The quick and increasingly popular fix? A 30-to-40-minute date with an IV bag filled with a cocktail of those nutrients you’re missing. The Dempster Clinic in Toronto offers treatments tailored to professionals in need of de-stressing, detoxification, or a performance pick-me-up.

Pulsed-electromagnetic frequency therapy

Overworked execs may think they’re accustomed to stress and anxiety, but on a cellular level, the constant tension prevents their body from adapting to injury and illness. A 30-to-60-minute magnetic therapy session, like that offered at Soul 7 Mindful Healing Technologies, uses low-frequency waves to reset cellular imbalances, stimulating processes that increase energy, reduce inflammation, and decrease depression. “You can think of it as modern-day acupuncture,” says clinic director Jacob Charendoff, noting that PEMF is far less invasive.

Float spa

A remote beach without reception has nothing on the relaxing effects of floating weightlessly in a highly concentrated saline bath. H2O Float Spa in Toronto offers the busy businessperson a break from, well, everything in the form of a three-visit program that teaches you to let go, calm mental static and, potentially over time, enter a stress-free state at will.

Cryotherapy

Following the principle of “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger,” a two-to-three-minute session in a cryosauna at -140 to -175 Celsius fools your body into entering a survival state that floods your brain with mind-altering endorphins. According to Roman Gersh, founder of Cryotherapy Health and Wellness in Toronto, the result is a boosted mood, increased energy, reduced pain, and fewer toxins floating in your bloodstream.

Audio visual entrainment

The jet-lagged jet setter may benefit from AVE, which uses pulses of light and sound to take your mind to a happier place without the need for mantras. According to a 2008 review of its effects, published in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, the brainwave-altering therapy (offered at Toronto’s Soul 7 Mindful Healing Technologies) could boost your mood, dissolve anxiety, improve memory, and reset your sleep cycle. Some practitioners believe repeated sessions can help train your mind to enter this heightened brain state at will.

Hypnotherapy

There’s nothing new-age about hypnotic therapies, which use a purely scientific approach to mitigate the trappings of a type-A personality: inability to relax, poor stress-management skills, and difficulty concentrating, according to a 2009 Equal Opportunities International article about new developments in managing job-related stress. If stress isn’t your problem, it can also subconsciously help improve your memory and boost your confidence as a public speaker.

Far-infrared sauna

Like a sauna on steroids, a pseudo steambath in infrared rays will help you detoxify, relieve pain, and resist disease—it's the perfect pick-me-up during crunch time. In a review of sauna as a therapeutic tool, the Institute for Functional Medicine notes that daily treatment significantly reduces high blood pressure. Unlike the traditional Finnish method, however, an infrared sauna produces less physical heat and penetrates much further into your body than steam—up to 1.5 inches.

HealthThe Bull Team